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Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Using 'Run as administrator'

Working with Windows 2012/14, SharePoint 2013, Visual Studio 2013/14, etc. on a server, even though logged in with an Administrator account, the permissions in Windows are set so that 90% of the time, it is necesssary to right click on something and choose 'Run as administrator' to get the proper access.

This is really prevalent with SharePoint - from the Command Line to PowerShell to Central Administration, 'Run as administrator' is required.

While I got used to this, turns out the quick fix has been there all along!

The best is to adjust both Shortcuts (like Central Administration) and the actual programs themselves (like PowerShell and Visual Studio (devenv.exe)). To find the exe for a given program, right click on a shortcut and select "Properties" (if Properties is not shown, use Open file location to find the true shortcut). From the Properties window, look at the Target field - that will have the path to the executable or URL link (like CA).

Once you have the shortcut or exe, right click and select Properties - on the Properties pop-up, click the Advanced button then click the checkbox for "Run as administrator" then click OK to save the change.

NOTE: For some items, like DevEnv.exe you can only set the Administrator option on the SHORTCUT. Right click on the shortcut from the Start menu and Open file location. Once there, you can set the Administrator rights on the shortcut there.

From there on, no need to right click anymore!

5 comments:

HeroBlog said...

The one thing I don't understand about all of this (well, there are a million other things as well :) is all this talk about running things under one account or another. I created a setup inside of a VM (I am using Parallels Desktop on a Mac) that includes Windows Server 2012r2, SQL Server 2012, Sharepoint 2013 and hopefully MS Project 2013, if I can ever get that to install correctly. I am using the win server as a non-domain server, so it seems that everything is running as local, with accounts set up as suggested here and there (sqlAdmin, spFarmAdmin, sp, etc.) Why can't I just say "do everything under one account - I don't care about security, I am the only one who has access to this machine." I sure wish I could find that switch! All I want to do is to set up a demo of Project Server 2013 for the students that I teach here in Nepal, and I can't believe what a struggle this has been. The setup I have seems to work, for example I can set up sites in IIS - I am even developing a wordpress site on this VM (see www.phoenixconsultingnepal.com) that I will move to a real host once finished - and the Sharepoint CA comes up and seems functional, but so many security-related problems, like this one. Arg...

HeroBlog said...

The one thing I don't understand about all of this (well, there are a million other things as well :) is all this talk about running things under one account or another. I created a setup inside of a VM (I am using Parallels Desktop on a Mac) that includes Windows Server 2012r2, SQL Server 2012, Sharepoint 2013 and hopefully MS Project 2013, if I can ever get that to install correctly. I am using the win server as a non-domain server, so it seems that everything is running as local, with accounts set up as suggested here and there (sqlAdmin, spFarmAdmin, sp, etc.) Why can't I just say "do everything under one account - I don't care about security, I am the only one who has access to this machine." I sure wish I could find that switch! All I want to do is to set up a demo of Project Server 2013 for the students that I teach here in Nepal, and I can't believe what a struggle this has been. The setup I have seems to work, for example I can set up sites in IIS - I am even developing a wordpress site on this VM (see www.phoenixconsultingnepal.com) that I will move to a real host once finished - and the Sharepoint CA comes up and seems functional, but so many security-related problems, like this one. Arg...

David M. Sterling said...

You can in fact use a single account if you intend to use it for demonstration/training only. You MUST use a domain account at minimum however. Be aware, Search and some other features will work differently (search might pick up unpublished items for example).

David M. Sterling said...

To be a little clearer - there are specific reasons for separate accounts. For example, the reason that the Search Service needs a Service account and a Content Access account is that one runs the service, the other is used to crawl content. The service account has too much permission and if used, will indexed unpublished items, etc. (a security risk).

The other accounts are used to manage the specific functions and features within SharePoint, for example Excel Services. You can use a single service account or break them up - the purpose is the SOA architecture - I have in fact, setup massive farms in which each service is it's own farm.

HeroBlog said...

Yes, I understand (most of that). I just wish the interface was more clear in this regard, and the technet articles on setting up accounts was not so dense (and inappropriate in my case). But I am surely in uncharted and unsupported waters with a single server, non-AD but workgroup installation of Sharepoint - ha! Most of which is working, but some not, for the reasons you have outlined (I think). Well, thx for the comments!
Jigs